Motorcycling For Sport On a Budget

LOGISTICS

The trickiest part about trying to arrange your motorcycling to provide you with a sporting outlet are the logistics.  You can’t ride a track/trials/dirt bike to where you’re going to ride it in a sporting fashion, so you need transportation options that’ll get you and your gear to where you intend to use it.

The obvious choice (if you’re looking for a budget choice) is to look at cargo vans – or so I thought.  Thanks to COVID, the market for these (like many other things) has gone bonkers as every unemployed rocket scientist in the world rushes out to grab a used van to deliver for Amazon.

Here are some current online choices:

My favourite is the fuggly Transit Connect that isn’t even big enough to hold a single bike and is almost a decade old with over two-hundred thousand kilometres on it for $10,500, $8,500.  Eight and half grand for a heavily used POS.  Both my current on-road bikes, an ’03 Triumph Tiger and an ’10 Kawasaki Concours together cost me less than that, and they’re both a joy to look at and operate, though carrying a dirt bike on them isn’t likely.


If I want to get my Guy Martin on, New Transits start at thirty-five grand and can easily option up to over fifty.  The bigger Ram Promasters start at thirty-seven grand and can option to over twice that.  The wee Promaster City starts at thirty-four grand and can be optioned well into the forties.  Vans only really do the cargo thing and make any other usage tedious, and they’re expensive!

The used car lot down Highway 6 has a 2015 Jeep Wrangler with 90k kms on it that they’re asking $35k for it.  It isn’t cheap but it seems in good nick and comes with the tow package.  We rented a Wrangler last year and I was impressed with its ability to carry weight and it’s utility – it was also surprisingly fun to drive… and in the summer it’d get the doors and roof off and be able to do the Zoolander thing too.


A trailer goes for about a grand, this one comes with a ramp and he’s asking $1300.  With a bit of bartering I could sort out a tow capable Wrangler with a useful trailer for under forty grand.  The Jeep isn’t new, but it’s only 6 years old and with a big v6 in it, 90k isn’t too much of a stressful life – it actually works out to only fifteen thousand kilometres a year.

What’s galling is that you’re thirty-five grand into a years old almost 100k kms vehicle but the new ones run fifty-three grand – I guess you’ve got to have a lot of cash on hand to buy anything these days.

What’d be really nice is a state-ot-the-art Wrangler 4xe.  They tow, use very little gasoline and when things get sorted out with in-car fusion generators, I’d be able to take the gas engine out and go fully electric with it.  In the meantime, it’d carry all my bike clobber, would be a bulletproof winter vehicle and when the sun arrives I can pop the doors and roof off and enjoy it in an entirely different way; they really are Swiss Army knives!



SPORTS RIDING OPTIONS: Trials


Once I’ve got the moto-logistics worked out I could then focus on some sporting motorbiking.  This ain’t cheap either, but some sport motorcycling is cheaper than others.  Trials riding is probably at the cheaper end of things with used bikes starting at about two grand and new, high-end performance models going up to about nine grand, though you can get a new, modern, Chinese made machine for under five grand.


I’m partial to older machines as I don’t have to deal with dealer servicing and can do the work myself.  This mid-80s Yamaha TY350 comes with lots of spares and is in ready-to-go shape for about $2600.  Since I’m not looking to take on Dougie Lampkin, this’d more than get me started in trials.


The Amateur Trials Riding Association of Ontario offers regular weekend events throughout the summer and fall and would make for a great target to aim for.  I’d be a rookie, but I’m not in it to win it, I’m in it to improve my moto-craft and trials offer a unique focus on balance and control in that regard.


I’m disinclined to exercise for the sake of it, though I’ve never had trouble exercising in order to compete in sports, it’s just hard to find any when you’re a fifty-two year old guy in Southwestern Ontario.  Having trials events to prepare for would be just the thing to get me into motion.

There is also the Southwestern Ontario Classic Trials group, who also offer a number of events and categories and seem very newbie friendly.  That old Yamaha would fit right in with classic trials and would let me do my own spannering.


Our backyard has everything you’d need to practice trials, though tire tracks all over the lawn might not endear me to my better half.  Even with all that in mind, trials riding would be the cheapest moto-sport to get going in.


SPORT RIDING OPTIONS:  enduro/off-road riding


What’s nice about the dirt-bike thing is that I could do it with my son, Max.  He got handy with dirt biking last summer at SMART Adventures so if we got into trail riding we could do it together.


Used dirt-bikes start at about $2500 and creep up quickly.  Most seem quite abused but appear to hold their value regardless.  For about six grand I could get us into two 21st Century machines that should be pretty dependable on the trails, the problem is there aren’t any around here.  We’d have to drive for hours to get to the few that are left in Central Ontario.

The Ontario Federation of Trail Riders would be a good place to start in terms of working out trails and connecting with others interested in the sport.  Off Road Ontario offers access to enduro and motocross racing, but I’m not really into the yee-haw MX thing, though long distance enduro gets my attention (every January I’m glued to the Dakar Rally).  I also watch a lot of British television and I’ve seen a number of endurance off-road events on there that are appealing, so I wouldn’t wave off enduro without looking into it a bit more.


SPORT RIDING OPTIONS:  track racing


There are motorcycle track days around Ontario from May to October.  The Vintage Road Racing Association seems like the best way in for someone not interested in becoming the next Marc Marquez but who is looking for some time on a bike working at the extreme ends of two-wheeled dynamics without having to worry about traffic.  The VRRA also offers a racing school to get people up to speed (so to speak).  I can’t say that having a racing licence wouldn’t be a cool thing to have.


The challenge with racing on pavement is that everything gets more expensive, from membership and training fees to the cost of equipment and bikes, and of course what it costs to fix them when you chuck them down the road.  Road racing offers a degree of speed and has obvious connections to road riding that are appealing, it’s only the costs that make it seem like a step too far.

Sport motorcycling is tricky to get into.  You need the equipment to transport yourself and your bike and gear to where you’re competing and then you also need the specialist motorbike itself, but there are options that can make it possible on not to extreme of a budget.  I’m hoping to find a way into this over the next few years.

from Blogger https://ift.tt/3lC7uK2
via IFTTT

1971 Triumph Bonneville Restoration: Front Fork Rebuild

It’s all snow and wind outside so I spent a good six hours in the garage this weekend rebuilding the front forks and the triple tree on the ’71 Bonneville winter project.

The forks on the bike had been ‘choppered’ with massive fork tubes and spacers in them.  The bike came with new stock fork tubes so after a cleanup both front forks got rebuilt with stock fork tubes.  I’ll put the chopper ones up for sale and see if it’ll make a dent in the new parts order I got in.

The internals on the forks were in good shape (it has always been stored inside).  After a cleanup they went back together again nicely.  The picture on the right gives you an idea of just how long those fork tubes were (almost as long as the whole shock!).
The right side front fork went right back in no problem, but  the left side one won’t fit in the lower triple tree mount (it has a bolt that squeezes it on but the circular clamp is too tight.  I’ve tried heating it up and wedging a screwdriver in the gap to respread it enough to accept a fork.  I shouldn’t complain, this is the only thing that’s being difficult on this fifty year old machine so far.
The lower fork unit as it came out of the giant chopper tubes.

The same piece cleaned up.

Parts diagram from the ’71 Triumph’s parts manual.

Meanwhile, the first parts order came in from British Cycle Parts.  They were great helping me clarify what I needed to get started.  The order was about $450 including shipping and got here quickly (within a week), one box from their Canadian warehouse and the other from their U.S. one.  I haven’t started installing anything yet, but I now have what I need to rebuild the Amal carbs, sort out the electrical system and take apart the motor to prep it to run for the first time.
Motor gasket set!

Electronic ignition system and coils!

Amal carburetor rebuild kits!

Rubber bits!  This time ’round I got a new kickstart rubber & the gear shift rubber.

That’s a stock style new rubber to replace whatever the f*** was on it.

The monkey who was choppering the bike put massive footpegs on the rear peg position,
but that doesn’t make any sense on a chopper (they’re usually feet up and forward).
These are the stock footrests.

Stock foot rests (and hardware)!

The plan is to rebuild the carbs, get the motor sorted, install the upgraded ignition system (which I suspect will also involve creating a new electrical loom) and then see if I can get it all to run.  Once I’ve got it a step closer to running I’ll be back in touch with BritCycle to get the other bits and pieces I need to get it rideable.  The plan is still to get it to a place of getting a safety and putting it on the road next season.
I’m not a big fan of lost causes and I wrench to ride, so the point is to get the Bonneville back into service. After watching a lot of Henry Cole on TV, I like the idea of a ‘rat bike‘, which also means I can focus on the mechanics rather than how it looks.  If I can get the mechanics sorted to the point where I can ride it, I’ll do a season with it rough but rideable and then consider my options.  I got the bike and spares for $1500 and I’ve just put another $450 into it.  I think I can get it roadworthy for under $4000 and a non-running barn find bike of similar era was going for a grand more than that a few weeks ago online, so no matter what the Bonnie project won’t ever drip red.
In a perfect world I’ll get it sorted and some one will offer me more than I’ve put into it (cost, not time, I’m happy to put time in keeping bikes on the road).  Whether that’s once it’s roadworthy or once it’s been cleaned up too, I’m easy.  Meanwhile the Bonneville is doing what I wanted it to:  giving me an opportunity to go deep on a motorcycle restoration and learn a lot in the process.

The motor’s getting cleaned up and recommissioned.

Once the (now stock) forks are back in I’ll wheel it out for a deep clean on the motor
and then start with the electrics before rebuilding the carbs.  With any luck the old Bonnie
will be to the point of starting by the new year.

Somewhere in between all this deep surgery, the Concours needs new brake pads and the Tiger has some new sprockets and a chain to install.  To be honest, these minor maintenance jobs are something to look forward to after the deep diving into the restoration project.

Last winter was a deep maintenance round on the Tiger, but even that pales in comparison to the scale and scope of the Bonneville restoration.  Practical Sportsbikes and Classic Bike are both magazines focused on hands-on motorcycle mechanics and both have talked about the dreaded project stallout that can happen when it all gets too much.  I’m taking the advice of both mags and breaking this up into chunks and then solving things subsystem by subsystem.  The small wins help me feel like like the project is progressing and prevent the dreaded project-stallout from being overwhelmed by the whole thing.
On the upside, the fact that we got 15cm of snow over the weekend isn’t really on my mind as I’m keeping track of many things-to-do in the garage.

from Blogger https://ift.tt/3FYxZ47
via IFTTT

50 Year Old Triumph Bonneville Restoration: Amal Carbs and the Fuel Tank

A place where logic, precision and cause and
effect still matter in a world gone mad.

 After the random weirdness of work, time in the garage with the old Bonneville is remarkably
straightforward and logical.  I suspect the bike was in the middle of a Captain America Easy Rider customization in the early/mid eighties when it got parked and time left it behind.  I got it from Brian’s storage shipping container where it was out of the weather and raised off the ground.  I don’t know where Brian got it from but I suspect it was always stored inside.  I battled with a mid-nineties Kawasaki that had been left outside back in 2014 and this much older machine is nothing like as seized, rusted and difficult to get into.

Anything that doesn’t immediately loosen gets a bit of heat and then comes free without any headaches.  Not being in a rush and leaning on the spannering skills I’ve refreshed over the past decade is making this an enjoyable and meditative process.

The surface rust came off the tank with a bit of sanding.  I’m going to see if I can knock out the dent and then strip it all back.  I used Metal Rescue on the Honda Fireblade tank in my last project and it did a fantastic job of cleaning that unused and rust tank out.  I’ll let it sit overnight and then do the power wash tomorrow and hopefully the tank’ll come back to me.

The Amal carburetors on the bike are remarkably simple compared to what I’ve been up against before.  Last time around it was a bank of four last-generation-before-fuel-injection carbs on a ’97 Honda Fireblade.  Before that it was a bank-of-four on a ’94 Kawasaki GTR1000 and then another complex bank of four on an ’81 Yamaha XS1100.  The old Bonnie’s single Amal carb per cylinder is a simpler design from a simpler time compared to those complex Japanese four-pot carbs.
Airbox sleeves off.

Carb clean up with a fine wire brush and wd40.
Some aluminum corrosion in the bottom of the carb bowls but it cleaned out nicely.

They’ve been sitting for a long while, but all the hard parts look to be in good shape.

After an initial cleanup I’m going to break down each carb and clean the hard parts in a ultrasonic cleaning bath before reassembling with new gasketry from British Cycle Supply Co..

I think my plan is to get the bike operational mechanically and have it going next spring having cleaned up and rust painted the frame and body.  Once it’s operational I’ll ride it for a season rough and get to know it before looking to a complete engine rebuild and deeper restoration of frame and body panels at a later date.

In order to get it back to rideable, these are the parts I think I’ll need:

  • carb gasket rebuild kit x 2
  • exhaust pipes x2
  • mufflers x2
  • ignition cables (and possibly some other electrics)
  • headlight
  • indicators
  • battery
  • head and sump gaskets for the motor (I intend to go in and clean things out/have a look around before I run it)

from Blogger https://ift.tt/3vZkJIM
via IFTTT

1971 Triumph Bonneville T120 Online Resources

Searching the internet for parts and technical details for a 1971 T120 Triumph Bonneville 650cc air cooled twin.  Here’s what I’ve found – hope it helps if you’re looking for similarly vintage parts and details.

Technical Details

https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0717/0717/files/1971_Oil_In_Frame_650_Unit_Twins_All_Models_EXPORT.pdf?2276925620862086622

https://www.tomcc.org/Triumph/FrameNumbers

https://www.fagengine.com/blogs/tech/triumph-engine-and-frame-numbers

https://triumph-tiger-90.com/dating-your-triumph/

https://www.baxtercyclebooks.com/FB/Triumph_1971_650cc_models/index.html

https://wiringdiagram.2bitboer.com/1971-triumph-bonneville-wiring-diagram/

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1sbSds50ChTpY_7q8SkhFVOQ5QoRAgc6y/view?usp=sharing

Love me some hand drawn drafting!

Parts

https://vintagetriumphparts.com/?model_filter_id=7

https://www.lowbrowcustoms.com/collections/vintage-triumph-parts

https://www.trojanclassics.com/header-pipes-triumph-tr6-t120-1971-balanced-pair-g

https://burtonbikebits.net/triumph-parts/

https://www.baxtercycle.com/product-category/vintage-triumph/

https://www.thebonnevilleshop.com/

https://kmjonesmotorsports.com/about

from Blogger https://ift.tt/3nwLgcy
via IFTTT

1971 Triumph Bonneville Motorcycle Restoration: the baseline

 Baseline photography for this 1971 Triumph Bonneville restoration project:

According to Low Brow Customs, this means I’ve got an A (January) E (October 1970 – July 1971) and was the 9125th 650 twin made that year (00100 is the starting number for each grouping so this was the 9225-100th motor made in the 1970-71 batch).
The frame was tricky to pick out – one of those sites mentions that the stampings are sometime very thin and this one’s barely there – our best guess is AE07050, which would put it in the same month/year as the motor, which seems promising.

The chopper stuff has started to come off and the bike is up on a wooden base on the stand in the back of the shop.  

Next up will be taking the tank off and beginning the GREAT DISMANTLE OF 2021!

from Blogger https://ift.tt/3aO6n4d
via IFTTT

Riding In The Rain: A ride into Algonquin Park in October

 Deerhurst Resort to Algonquin Park and back again, chased by the rain.

Algonquin Park in the rain at the height of autumn colours. The Theta 360 camera held up but I eventually pocketed it when the deluge become too heavy.  The camera is mounted on a ball mount on the handlebars and set to fire automatically every 10 seconds.  Photos captured in the Theta camera app and then modified/enhanced in Photoshop.

This is the raw photo out of the camera. The fixed lense doesn’t collect a lot of light, so on a dim, rainy day like this the image is quite muddy.  I brought up the shadows in Photoshop and the result (with a bit of cropping) is the same photo above.

If you’re curious about how to put together on-bike photos, check this how-to out.  It’s also available on Adventure Bike Rider Magazine’s site here.  You can pick up a simple 360 camera for a couple of hundred bucks.  Fully waterproof ones (which I obviously need) start a bit higher.

I got into this with Ricoh’s Theta way back in 2013, but Ricoh has been stingy about support and won’t even offer me at-cost options for educational use.  Looking around recently, the Insta360 offers some interesting combinations with next generation 360 imaging, though it’s very video focused and I prefer still shooting.  Gopro also has the 360 Max, though it isn’t as aerodynamic and therefore might not be the thing to put on a bike in the wind, though I’m willing to give it a go.
Gopro goes out of its way to support users and especially ones who advertise for them on social media.  I wish Ricoh were so forward thinking, but they aren’t.  I’d suggest the Gopro if you want to get into 360 photography.  It’s remarkably easy to set up and the results look fantastic.  You should give it a try.

Post from RICOH THETA. – Spherical Image – RICOH THETA

from Blogger https://ift.tt/3lwnWfn
via IFTTT

One To Add To Your Ontario Rides List: Huntsville to Rosseau to Port Carling

https://goo.gl/maps/ss7VMTaf1LVey7j76

If you’re up in the Muskokas, this is a nice ride.  It’s about 60kms through Canadian Shield/lake of the woods on some very non-southwestern Ontario windy roads.  It started off overcast but then the sub broke through and painted the already incredible October Ontario fall-colours with a nuclear paintbrush.

The Concours and I managed it in about 90 minutes from Huntsville to just outside of Port Carling.  The road is in reasonable condition (for Ontario) and it’s never dull.  The initial bit on Muskoka Road 3 is a nice warmup, but it’s the 632/7 from Rosseau to Highway 118 that really pops!

It sure is pretty in October…

from Blogger https://ift.tt/30qjTtb
via IFTTT

Taking My Motorcycle Restorations to the Next Level

Heavy rain all week made Beaver Valley a
muddy mess.  The Tiger waded through it all,
spinning it’s wheels in the deep mud but
always getting me down the track.

Sunday was a long ride up north to clear my head after another week of pandemic teaching where they pile on extra work going on two years into a pandemic and then reduce your ability to do it.  The trusty Tiger was on song and we sailed and sailed, up past Horning’s Mills and through Creemore before tackling the Grey Highlands.  I was timing the ride because I had a meeting!

Last week I joined the Canadian Vintage Motorcycle Group and then connected with their Facebook page (that part is free – if you’re into old bikes I’d urge you to join up!).  By dumb luck the admin who accepted my FB group request happens to live nearby and has a lockup ten minutes from where I live.  He asked if I wanted to see what he had kicking around in terms of project bikes I could buy.  That CVMG membership is already paying off!

Four hours and three hundred kilometres later I rolled up to a farm just south of town and met Brian and his lovely wife Terry.  We drove down to his storage containers out of sight at the back of the farm and he unlocked a hidden magical kingdom!

The bike I think I’m going to do a full ground up restoration on is a 1971 Triumph Bonneville.  This year was the first oil-in-frame model.  There are benefits to this model that suit me, the main one being that this bike has a taller seat than other Bonnies.

The bike in question has been partially ‘choppered’ with a big sissy bar and king/queen seat.  It also has long front forks – someone was on their way to turning this into some kind of Easy Rider homage, but it won’t stay that way.  I’m not stuck on the stock-at-all-costs angle but I like motorcycling for the dynamic feel of it and a chopper isn’t about that.  A modernized custom that stays true to the original look but makes use of the bits and pieces that will make this classic a bit more dependable is where I’m at.

Fortunately, Brian has lots of stock spares which he’d include with it so I’ll be able to strip it down and begin working out how to put it all back together again without having to start from scratch.  When I pick up the bike I should also be getting some tupperware boxes full of additional parts.

Classic Bike Magazine had a great issue in June about Steve McQueen, On Any Sunday and desert racers.  McQueen himself did a Bonneville desert sled back in the ’60s.  I like the stripped down scrambler look of that kind of bike, though I’m not going to go all knobbly tires and brown seat with it, but a simplified, high piped Bonneville for the road?  That’s something I could get into!

I’m going to have to wait until after Thanksgiving Weekend to get my hands on it. I ‘ll also have to figure out how to get it over here, but I’m looking forward to my first deep bike resto after successfully putting a number of early retirements back on the road again.  This one’s going to be an engine out, frame up restoration, Henry Cole style!

Back to stock? The ’71 was the first of the oil in frame Bonnevilles and an odd duck with
a tall seat height, but it was also a handsome thing!

from Blogger https://ift.tt/3itrH3n
via IFTTT

Environmental Marketing

Out for a ride the other day, I had a hybrid car driver go off unprovoked about how un-environmental motorcycles are.  My son and I were two-up on my 2010 Kawasaki Concours 14 when we pulled in to a stop and got unsolicited advice from the ignorant.

There are lighter bikes with smaller motors that get significantly higher gas mileage, but the Connie does a fine job of moving two people through the world using amazingly little in terms of natural resources.  It also has a virtuous manufacturing history compared to many other vehicles, especially ones that move on lithium power.

This proud-Prius driver got his back up when I suggested that my bike gets better mileage than his dual-engined hybrid (it does – his AWD Prius gets 52/48mpg on its city/highway cycles, my C14 is currently averaging 4.5 litres/100kms mostly two up, which works out to just over 52mpg).  That Toyota, like my Kawasaki, is made in Japan by unionized workers who are paid a living wage to build world-class machines.  Being Japanese, they also both lean heavily on locally manufactured parts.  More and more vehicles are being built in developing countries, which can be a good thing but can also be an excuse to force labour on people who could never afford what they’re building.  Globalism doesn’t like to show the off-shore slavery that makes it run.

Where I think our two vehicles diverge are in the inherent compromises in the design of that Toyota.  Lugging around two seperate drivetrains is incredibly inefficient.  It’s impressive that the hybrid drive has evolved to the point where it can post the mileage numbers it does, but it’s still having to lug around a gas tank and gasoline powered motor in addition to batteries and electric motors.  Other than the much-vaunted fuel efficiency, the cost of maintenance must be miserable.  By comparison, the efficient shaft-drive and motor on the Kwak are designed to do hundreds of thousands of high-efficiency (or fast if you prefer) miles without any of that overhead.

The most onerous (and hidden) part of that mechanical overhead are the lithium batteries in that hybrid.  I teach computer engineering as my day job and I’m well up on our medieval battery power development.  We are stuck with poor performing, environmentally bankrupt, chemical battery technology from somewhere in the late 19th Century.  Instead of addressing the immanent climate emergency by producing smaller, more efficient vehicles, we’re using electric and hybrid electric as an excuse to produce slightly more efficient behemoths.

Lithium batteries are a nightmare.  From a safety standpoint they are a potentially explosive disaster and from a power to weight ratio they are next to useless, but they’re the best we have.  The nightmare gets worse though when you look at how we’re managing lithium production in a world that desperately needs more of it.  As you’d expect, transnational companies with no real oversight are abusing developing countries (as they have since colonial times) with aggressive economic tactics in order to strip local peoples of the natural resources beneath their feet.  International mining concerns ferment government instability in order to ensure cheap access to in-demand resources.  Money likes to condense where it already exists and the electric car battery market has all the hallmarks of blood diamonds in terms of the distribution of wealth involved.

There are a lot of advantages to electric vehicles and I hope to get into them sooner than later, but these early adopter vehicles are being driven by and for the privileged wealthy and are mined and manufactured by environmentally and socially bankrupt transnational companies chasing dollar signs (as it has always been).

If you’re all about leveraging your privilege in order to wander around with your chest out bragging about how much you care about the planet, do a bit of research first.  There is a darkside to rushing electric vehicle sales before we’ve worked out the tech that amplifies rather than resolves our resource shortages.  The immanent climate disaster needs solutions, not a shell-game where old white guys get to tell everyone about how much they care by driving overweight, compromised designs based more on marketing than actually solving the coming crisis.

That same day we filled up before riding home.  I put $28 of premium in to fill up the bike.  The guy next to me pulled up in a new hybrid F150 pickup truck that looked bigger than a house.  He proceeded to put nearly $200 of gas into it.  I asked him how far that’d get him and he told me about how the hybrid electric was so efficient that he’d get about a thousand kilometers to the tank.  I get just shy of 500 to a tank on the bike, so for what he put in I could cover 2000kms.  I know this is apples to oranges as that pickup could do things the bike can’t, like carry loads, except this one with its never used bed and chrome wheels wasn’t carrying much of anything, and therein lies the real issue with this hybrid fad; instead of directing us to use less (which would actually help us deal with the climate emergency), hybrid technology is being used by car companies to justify an unsustainable habit of ever larger and improbable vehicles.  If we could all do more with less we might just make it out of this mess.

The Corvette owners club rocked up at the gas station then.  The new Vette goes 0-60 almost a fast as my decade old Connie while using twice the fuel.  With only two seats it makes a more direct comparison with the bike in terms of functionality and usefulness.  The plethora of old white guys who hopped out of their new Vettes all spent 12 to 15 times what I did to buy their toys, the difference is that my gasoline powered recreational decisions aren’t burning a hole in the world.

If you really want to help out, get smaller and use less – riding a bike is a great place to start.  Your other option is to keep playing into the enviro-marketing games until we’re all watching the world burn to the ground around us.  I won’t go into how charging all these electric vehicles on our already overloaded and vulnerable electrical infrastructure is going to poke holes in other aspects of life.  We need people to change their minds about what green is, and the first step isn’t to throw technology at old habits, it’s to do more with less.

Some Research on Battery Powered Vehicles  (in case you can’t be bothered to do it yourself)

https://www.varsity.co.uk/science/20401

Starving arid regions of their drinking water to feed the world’s insatiable appetite for lithium?  If you know where the technology comes from, it gets difficult to stay on that high horse.

“The ethics of electric vehicles is far more complicated than the expensive car adverts and glowing newspaper headlines would have us believe.”

https://www.thoughtco.com/lithium-production-2340123

Lithium production is a messy business.

https://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/201208/backpage.cfm

Lithium development has stalled and initial optimism is fading.  You’re not going to be preplacing your worn out lithium batteries with something better in your EV any time soon – but you will be replacing them with yet more lithium.

https://www.ford.ca/trucks/f150/f150-lightning/2022//?gnav=header-trucks-vhp

Instead of immanent climate disaster modifying our driving habits and producing smaller vehicles that use less of everything, we’re leveraging electric vehicles to keep churning out excess.  When people plug in behemoths like this we’ll end up having to turn on coal powered hydro plants just to keep the lights on.

With Ontario spending hundreds of millions to cancel carbon neutral electricity production, we all appear more than happy to simply hide our carbon output rather than actually reduce it.

https://www.energyvoice.com/renewables-energy-transition/158058/bmw-i3-ad-pulled-due-misleading-electric-vehicle-claims/

Car companies are selling environmentalism hard, even when what they’re selling isn’t.

from Blogger https://ift.tt/3uAki7h
via IFTTT